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Exhibitions - Upcoming


Fashion: Flowers (Andy Warhol Film Screening)

August

SPECIAL FILM SCREENING EVERY FRIDAY UNTIL CLOSE
Approximately 27 minutes
In 1979 Warhol opened his own production studio and created three cable television series between 1979 and 1987. The first series, Fashion, was a video magazine similar to Warhol’s Interview with the emphasis on the fashion industry and the fashion designer as celebrity and the fashion show as the new spectacle. This episode features interviews with four New York City florists: Jim Gosslee, owner of the trend-setting flower shop Goslee & Company at Madison Avenue and 80th Street; Frank Tomaino, the founder of Rhinelander Florist who sold flowers to the Rockefellers, Astors and Whitneys; Ed Steck of Fantasy Flowers who talks about the interesting people who patronize a flower shop that is open 24/7, in New York’s Chelsea Flower District; and Tommy Pashun who supplies and cares for the fashion designer Halston’s famous collection of orchids.

The florists discuss the types of arrangements they carry, based on the tastes of their clientele; their celebrity or "society" customers; the varieties of flowers that are most popular in their shops; the biggest jobs they have done for politicians, churches, and celebrations; the history of the orchid’s popularity; fashionable flowers such as calla lillies; the key to flower arranging; and many other flower stories.


Fashion: Flowers (Andy Warhol Film Screening)

August

SPECIAL FILM SCREENING EVERY FRIDAY UNTIL CLOSE
Approximately 27 minutes
In 1979 Warhol opened his own production studio and created three cable television series between 1979 and 1987. The first series, Fashion, was a video magazine similar to Warhol’s Interview with the emphasis on the fashion industry and the fashion designer as celebrity and the fashion show as the new spectacle. This episode features interviews with four New York City florists: Jim Gosslee, owner of the trend-setting flower shop Goslee & Company at Madison Avenue and 80th Street; Frank Tomaino, the founder of Rhinelander Florist who sold flowers to the Rockefellers, Astors and Whitneys; Ed Steck of Fantasy Flowers who talks about the interesting people who patronize a flower shop that is open 24/7, in New York’s Chelsea Flower District; and Tommy Pashun who supplies and cares for the fashion designer Halston’s famous collection of orchids.

The florists discuss the types of arrangements they carry, based on the tastes of their clientele; their celebrity or "society" customers; the varieties of flowers that are most popular in their shops; the biggest jobs they have done for politicians, churches, and celebrations; the history of the orchid’s popularity; fashionable flowers such as calla lillies; the key to flower arranging; and many other flower stories.


Fashion: Flowers (Andy Warhol Film Screening)

August

SPECIAL FILM SCREENING EVERY FRIDAY UNTIL CLOSE
Approximately 27 minutes
In 1979 Warhol opened his own production studio and created three cable television series between 1979 and 1987. The first series, Fashion, was a video magazine similar to Warhol’s Interview with the emphasis on the fashion industry and the fashion designer as celebrity and the fashion show as the new spectacle. This episode features interviews with four New York City florists: Jim Gosslee, owner of the trend-setting flower shop Goslee & Company at Madison Avenue and 80th Street; Frank Tomaino, the founder of Rhinelander Florist who sold flowers to the Rockefellers, Astors and Whitneys; Ed Steck of Fantasy Flowers who talks about the interesting people who patronize a flower shop that is open 24/7, in New York’s Chelsea Flower District; and Tommy Pashun who supplies and cares for the fashion designer Halston’s famous collection of orchids.

The florists discuss the types of arrangements they carry, based on the tastes of their clientele; their celebrity or "society" customers; the varieties of flowers that are most popular in their shops; the biggest jobs they have done for politicians, churches, and celebrations; the history of the orchid’s popularity; fashionable flowers such as calla lillies; the key to flower arranging; and many other flower stories.


Fashion: Flowers (Andy Warhol Film Screening)

August

SPECIAL FILM SCREENING EVERY FRIDAY UNTIL CLOSE
Approximately 27 minutes
In 1979 Warhol opened his own production studio and created three cable television series between 1979 and 1987. The first series, Fashion, was a video magazine similar to Warhol’s Interview with the emphasis on the fashion industry and the fashion designer as celebrity and the fashion show as the new spectacle. This episode features interviews with four New York City florists: Jim Gosslee, owner of the trend-setting flower shop Goslee & Company at Madison Avenue and 80th Street; Frank Tomaino, the founder of Rhinelander Florist who sold flowers to the Rockefellers, Astors and Whitneys; Ed Steck of Fantasy Flowers who talks about the interesting people who patronize a flower shop that is open 24/7, in New York’s Chelsea Flower District; and Tommy Pashun who supplies and cares for the fashion designer Halston’s famous collection of orchids.

The florists discuss the types of arrangements they carry, based on the tastes of their clientele; their celebrity or "society" customers; the varieties of flowers that are most popular in their shops; the biggest jobs they have done for politicians, churches, and celebrations; the history of the orchid’s popularity; fashionable flowers such as calla lillies; the key to flower arranging; and many other flower stories.


Fashion: Flowers (Andy Warhol Film Screening)

August

SPECIAL FILM SCREENING EVERY FRIDAY UNTIL CLOSE
Approximately 27 minutes
In 1979 Warhol opened his own production studio and created three cable television series between 1979 and 1987. The first series, Fashion, was a video magazine similar to Warhol’s Interview with the emphasis on the fashion industry and the fashion designer as celebrity and the fashion show as the new spectacle. This episode features interviews with four New York City florists: Jim Gosslee, owner of the trend-setting flower shop Goslee & Company at Madison Avenue and 80th Street; Frank Tomaino, the founder of Rhinelander Florist who sold flowers to the Rockefellers, Astors and Whitneys; Ed Steck of Fantasy Flowers who talks about the interesting people who patronize a flower shop that is open 24/7, in New York’s Chelsea Flower District; and Tommy Pashun who supplies and cares for the fashion designer Halston’s famous collection of orchids.

The florists discuss the types of arrangements they carry, based on the tastes of their clientele; their celebrity or "society" customers; the varieties of flowers that are most popular in their shops; the biggest jobs they have done for politicians, churches, and celebrations; the history of the orchid’s popularity; fashionable flowers such as calla lillies; the key to flower arranging; and many other flower stories.


Fashion: Flowers (Andy Warhol Film Screening)

September

SPECIAL FILM SCREENING EVERY FRIDAY UNTIL CLOSE
Approximately 27 minutes
In 1979 Warhol opened his own production studio and created three cable television series between 1979 and 1987. The first series, Fashion, was a video magazine similar to Warhol’s Interview with the emphasis on the fashion industry and the fashion designer as celebrity and the fashion show as the new spectacle. This episode features interviews with four New York City florists: Jim Gosslee, owner of the trend-setting flower shop Goslee & Company at Madison Avenue and 80th Street; Frank Tomaino, the founder of Rhinelander Florist who sold flowers to the Rockefellers, Astors and Whitneys; Ed Steck of Fantasy Flowers who talks about the interesting people who patronize a flower shop that is open 24/7, in New York’s Chelsea Flower District; and Tommy Pashun who supplies and cares for the fashion designer Halston’s famous collection of orchids.

The florists discuss the types of arrangements they carry, based on the tastes of their clientele; their celebrity or "society" customers; the varieties of flowers that are most popular in their shops; the biggest jobs they have done for politicians, churches, and celebrations; the history of the orchid’s popularity; fashionable flowers such as calla lillies; the key to flower arranging; and many other flower stories.


Edmondson and Friends: Breaking the Mold

September 27 2014 - January 4 2015

Almost fifteen years after organizing a major the William Edmondson traveling exhibition, Cheekwood is honoring this African-American artist from Nashville with a new exhibition. ht the Edmondson sculptures from its permanent collection supplemented by selected loans from other collections. This will be the first survey exhibition of Edmondson’s work since Cheekwood Edmondson is a luminary in the story of 20th century American art and has served as a source of inspiration for many younger artists, even during his lifetime. This exhibition presents select works by Edmondson in the company of sculptors and painters who have followed in his footsteps.

Edmondson was a visionary who inspired numerous artists over the years. He was a self-taught sculptor who never left Nashville but who made a lasting impression in the history of American art. Edmondson, like his kindred spirits Thornton Dial and Lonnie Holley, pushed the idea of self-taught to another level with a bold and sophisticated approach to making art from base material. William Edmondson and Friends: Breaking the Mold seeks to create a dialogue between Edmondson and a range of artists, many of them from Tennessee, who have broken the mold of their medium. Besides Dial and Holley, the preliminary list of Edmondson “friends” includes Red Grooms, Olen Bryant, Puryear Mims, Alan Lequire, Tim Lewis, and Greg Ridley. Some of them met the artist during his lifetime, others only learned about his work after he had passed away. The artists that are included in this exhibition have channeled on different levels whether it is through the use of medium (stone carving), the carving technique, the vision (divine inspiration), or perhaps a similar sense of humor. The exhibition invites visitors to meet a diverse community of artists who have carried forward Edmondson’s love for stone carving and interpreted it in often separate and distinct ways.


Pop-Up Gallery

October

Location to be determined
For the third year in a row, Cheekwood is planning a Pop-Up Gallery in conjunction with Nashville’s ArtOber art crawl. The Pop-Up gallery will feature work by acclaimed “outsider” artist Lonnie Holley. An artist and musician from Alabama who now lives and works in Atlanta, Holley creates sculptures out of found objects by himself or in community collaboration. His works are now in the collections of the Birmingham Museum of Art as well as the Smithsonian Institution. He and the artist Thornton Dial recently received commissions from the Metro Arts Commission and with support from the NEA to create an outdoor sculpture for Nashville’s Edmondson Park.


Scholastic Art Competition and Exhibition

January 31 - March 8 2015

For the 24th consecutive year, Cheekwood is proud to partner with the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers to host the Scholastic Art Awards, one of the oldest and most prestigious student art competitions in the country. Creative, imaginative and talented teens from across Middle Tennessee are invited to submit works of art in a variety of categories.

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