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EL DÍA DE
LOS MUERTOS

ENTERTAINMENT

Sunday, October 30

In the Beer Garden
Giovanni Rodriguez Salsa Quartet | 11 am – 1 pm
San Rafael Band | 1:30 – 3:30 PM

In Massey Auditorium
Bi-lingual Song and Storytime with Rachel Rodriguez | 10:00 -10:30 AM
Aztec Dancers | 10:30 AM*
Rose Rodriguez | 11 – 11:45 AM
Ruben Dario | 12 – 12:45 PM
Aztec Dancers | 1 PM*
Mi Cielito Lindo | 2 – 2:30 PM
Aztec Dancers | 3:30 PM*

*Aztec Dancers to be moved outside if at all possible.

Frist Learning Center Great Hall
Fernando Ramos, Trovador | 10:30 AM – 1 PM

VENDORS

Sunday, October 30

Art & Goods
Parking Lot B |9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Bows by Nici
Cheekwood Gift Shop
Makeup Ninja
Mat’s Jewelry Designs
Skulls & Flowers
The Llama House
Vera Art
Cindy David
Najah – Natural Care

Food
Beer Garden
Birria Babe

Parking Lot B
Caracasville
Delicias Columbiana RR
Las Fajitas Mexican Restaurant
Maria’s Snacks
Nelly’s Peruvian Sweets
Siete Luminarias
The Inka Trailer

ART & ACTIVITIES

Sunday, October 30 | 9 AM – 4 PM

Frist Learning Painting Studios
MARIGOLD FLOWER CROWN
Flowers, which symbolize the brevity of life, are an essential element of Day of the Dead celebrations, but none more than the marigold. Create your own paper marigolds and affix them on a headband to wear throughout the day.

SUGAR SKULLS
During the celebration of Día de Los Muertos, sugar skulls are often used to decorate the ofrendas. These skulls, though not edible, are perfect for decorating an at-home altar or celebration.

COLORING SHEET
Learn about the some of the items often used during El Día de los Muertos, including pan de muerto, candles, and marigolds, on a fun coloring sheet for kids of all ages.

Frist Learning Center Great Hall
GOBELINO | 10 AM – 2 PM
Watch Carlos Vazquez create a gobelino, or tapestry, using a traditional Spanish loom.

Massey Auditorium
MEMORY TREE
Write the name or memory of a loved one on a colorful slip of paper and add it to the memory tree.

Beer Garden
ALEBRIJE *CANCELLED*
Alebrijes are brightly colored Mexican folk-art sculptures of fantastical creatures. Take part in creating one based on a Tennessee animal – the coyote – that will become part of Cheekwood festivals in the future.


PHOTO OPS

Saturday, October 29 & Sunday, October 30 | 9 AM – 5 PM

Catrina & Catrin Puppets | Botanic Hall

Marigold Wall | Frist Learning Center Great Hall
The bright orange marigolds make the perfect backdrop for a festive photo to remember the weekend celebration.

MURALS/LOS MURALES

Sunday, October 30 | 9 AM – 5 PM
Frist Learning Center Great Hall

Murals depicting the Day of the Dead have a strong history throughout Latin America, highlighted by the works of Diego Rivera and José Guadalupe Posada, the creator of the iconic Catrina figure. Finding inspiration in these artists, students from local middle and high schools will create large-scale works which will hang in the Great Hall.

Participating Schools
Cane Ridge High School
Cora Howe Art Studio
Culleoka Unit School Spanish Club
Davidson Academy
Hume-Fogg High School Visual Art
McMurray Middle School
Meigs Academic Magnet Middle School
Nolensville High School
Oakland High School
St. Cecilia Academy Art Club
St. Cecilia Academy Spanish Club
Stratford STEM High School
University School of Nashville International Club
University School of Nashville Lucha Group


ALTARS

Sunday, October 30 | 9 AM – 5 PM
Massey Auditorium

One of the most important aspects of El Día de los Muertos is the creation of a memorial altar for the departed, known as an ofrenda. All across Mexico and beyond, families honor their ancestors by creating altars decorated with items that the deceased enjoyed in life. Learn more about this tradition as you tour the creative ofrendas designed by local groups and organizations.

Alveole
Casa Mexico
Catholic Charities
FUTURO, Inc.
KIPP Nashville
KIPP Nashville SRE Team
Lopez Family
MLK Jr. Academic Magnet High School
MNPD Family Intervention Program
Mundito Spanish
Paragon Mills Elementary
University School of Nashville
Vanderbilt University- Center for Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies


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